CCTV shows an e-cigarette explode in office worker’s face as he goes to take a puff

By | January 9, 2017


An office worker only just escaped serious injury when an electronic cigarette exploded in his face as he went to take a puff. 

CCTV shows the man fiddling with the e-cigarette, also known as a vape, before bringing it up to to his face where it explodes in a cloud of sparks and smoke.

He was left clutching his head in agony after the blast at the office in Massachusetts.

CCTV shows the man fiddling with the e-cigarette, also known as a vape, before bringing it up to to his face

CCTV shows the man fiddling with the e-cigarette, also known as a vape, before bringing it up to to his face

CCTV shows the man fiddling with the e-cigarette, also known as a vape, before bringing it up to to his face

Just before he brings the device to his lips it explodes in a cloud of sparks and smoke

Just before he brings the device to his lips it explodes in a cloud of sparks and smoke

Just before he brings the device to his lips it explodes in a cloud of sparks and smoke

The video was posted online by the man’s boss who claimed his employee required 12 stitches in his face after the accident.

Earlier this year burns surgeons and firemen warned about the dangers of e-cigarettes after treating a string of smokers injured by exploding devices.

The number of injuries caused by exploding e-cigarettes is on the rise, the FDA has warned, with 66 explosions occurring in 2015 and early 2016 alone.

That’s compared with 92 explosions between 2009 and September 2015 – averaging around 18 a year, or 27 per cent of the most recent totals. 

And those figures could be an undercount – just one hospital, Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, says it has seen about 23 patients with e-cigarette burns since it started tracking them informally in October 2015. 

Faulty batteries, coupled with increasing popularity, are the suspected culprits in the dramatic increase in injuries. The industry maintains e-cigarettes are safe when used properly.  

The video was posted online by the man's boss who claimed his employee received 12 stitches in his face after the accident

The video was posted online by the man's boss who claimed his employee received 12 stitches in his face after the accident

The video was posted online by the man’s boss who claimed his employee received 12 stitches in his face after the accident

The worker was left clutching his face in agony after the blast at the office in Massachusetts

The worker was left clutching his face in agony after the blast at the office in Massachusetts

The worker was left clutching his face in agony after the blast at the office in Massachusetts, USA

The problems with the devices are linked to their lithium-ion batteries, which help vaporize liquid nicotine into a mist that distributors and some health experts say is far less harmful than traditional tobacco cigarettes.

The same types of batteries are used safely in many consumer electronics, but they’ve also been behind fires in hover boards and smartphones.  

Last year, the federal Department of Transportation issued a rule prohibiting passengers from packing e-cigarettes in checked luggage to protect against in-flight fires.

And their popularity cannot be denied: There were 10.8 million regular e-cigarette users in the US in 2015, generating $3.5 billion in sales, according to Euromonitor International, a market research company. 



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